Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Chattanooga and the Revolutionary War


Copyright © Kay Gaensler Photography - Creative Commons. 

Tennessee wasn't one of the 13 original colonies and Chattanooga hadn't been founded yet, but that doesn't mean the city doesn't have ties to the Revolutionary War. Here's a 4th of July roundup for you of Chattanooga's connections to Independence Day!

  • A battle with local Native Americans on Lookout Mountain was one of the last official battles of the Revolutionary War. A plaque placed on Lookout Mountain reads:
Historical Marker TranscriptionAmerican Revolutionary War Battle The Chattanooga area was firmly controlled by the Chickamauga Indians at the time of The American Revolution. The Cherokee Indian chiefs had signed peace and land treaties with the Colonial settlers. However, a small group of rebellious Cherokees were not in accord with these treaties and continued unabated warfare with the expanding settlers. They were called the Chickamaugas and were led by Chief Dragging Canoe. They were actively supported by the British through local agents and traders. The Government of North Carolina authorized a force of some 250 "Nolichucky Riflemen" to pursue the Chickamaugas and to rescue captives. On September 20, 1782, after several minor encounters, Sevier and his men engaged the Chickamaugas in a battle high in the palisades at the north end of Lookout Mountain. The Frontiersmen's accurate rifle fire soon overcame their foes. This was an official Revolutionary War engagement and is considered by many to be the LAST "OVERMOUNTAIN" BATTLE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. The preliminary signing of the peace treaty ending the Revolution was on November 30, 1782 Placed by the John Sevier Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution September 22, 2007The Chattanooga area was firmly controlled by the Chickamauga Indians at the time of The American Revolution. The Cherokee Indian chiefs had signed peace and land treaties with the Colonial settlers. However, a small group of rebellious Cherokees were not in accord with these treaties and continued unabated warfare with the expanding settlers. They were called the Chickamaugas and were led by Chief Dragging Canoe. They were actively supported by the British through local agents and traders. The Government of North Carolina authorized a force of some 250 "Nolichucky Riflemen" to pursue the Chickamaugas and to rescue captives. On September 20, 1782, after several minor encounters, Sevier and his men engaged the Chickamaugas in a battle high in the palisades at the north end of Lookout Mountain. The Frontiersmen's accurate rifle fire soon overcame their foes. This was an official Revolutionary War engagement and is considered by many to be the LAST "OVERMOUNTAIN" BATTLE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. The preliminary signing of the peace treaty ending the Revolution was on November 30, 1782 Placed by the John Sevier Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution September 22, 2007The preliminary signing of the peace treaty ending the Revolution was on November 30, 1782 Placed by the John Sevier Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution September 22, 2007Placed by the John Sevier Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution September 22, 2007Lookout Mountain.

Thanks to Markeroni for the transcription!